4 Ways Caregivers Grow a Senior Care Auditing Careers

As the frail aged population mushrooms in growth and charges of elder abuse and neglect are on the rise, where is the silver lining for caregivers?  Today the certified Senior Care Auditor can save the day for the elder and the caregiver.  In addition to being an alternative to providing personal care, or an add-on service for an existing elder care service, SCAs are becoming the new elite of personal care providers.

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Senior Care Auditors holding tablets

Whether you work for an SCA agency part time, or you need a full time independent career, or maybe you like the home care agency you work for and see the opportunities to grow professionally and help your agency grow, too, the doors are wide open for you now.

In this article we talk about how to grow your Senior Care Auditor career whether you work for yourself or someone else.

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Help your agency provide a great new service by becoming a Certified Senior Care Auditor

1)AGENCY:  Much like the physician liaison is constantly on the move, visiting clinics and making connections, the Certified Senior Care Auditor (CSCA) helps home care agencies and individuals check up on the safety, wellbeing, and possible unmet needs of frail elders and other vulnerable adults who might someday become care clients for the agency.

SCAs can  function as a  Quality Assurance Liaisons for the home care agency they work for.  This service can enormously please clients who appreciate the extra care and interest in their case – and in them.  Happy clients make for good reviews by word of mouth and online, and more referrals.

2)LAWYERS and SOCIAL WORKERS: Faster and Easier Reporting

Here’s something to think about:
Recent studies have shown that long work hours increased the chances of early death by almost 20%*.

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Lawyers and social workers dread reporting. Compiling this data and fashioning it into meaningful reports can take A LOT of time and energy.  It is super stressful and a LOT of work.  But that is their job.  Yours can be to go get the information they need to decide whether or not to pursue prosecution of a case.  You can make their life much easier and for less money than a traditional investigator (who knows nothing about the elderly).

The use of Senior Care Auditors  helps lawyers and social workers compile their field notes more efficiently and with MUCH less work and stress.  Happy lawyers and social workers, after they have found they can trust your reports, make for more referrals coming your or your agencies way. This directs the flow of money straight to your bottom line.

To become a Certified Senior Care Auditor you can only go to CertifiedCare.org for accredited PCA/SCA education and registry.

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3) LONG DISTANCE CAREGIVERS:  Lots of adult children live hundreds or thousands of miles away from their parents or other elderly loved ones. It is not uncommon in the United States and increasingly this phenomenon is spreading worldwide as younger people move into large cites for economic opportunities.  But, just because your far away does not mean you do not care or are not interested in the well being of those you left behind.  This is where a Senior Care Auditor comes in.  SCAs can check on your loved one and report back giving reassurance or reality checks about circumstances and conditions which otherwise might come to light.

 

There's not enough hours in the Day so use a Senior Care Auditor to check on elderly loved ones.

4) NOT ENOUGH HOURS IN THE DAY:

There are two  ‘close cousins’ of the long distance caregiver:  One is the caregiver who is ‘sandwiched’ between work, kids, and ‘life’. The other is the hard working people who put in long, demanding, and/or unpredictable hours who simply do not have the time and energy to also spend on a loved one, no matter how much they might wish they could. Both of these people can use a certified SCA to make their lives easier.  The SCA does the job they cannot do (and probably do it even better).  This helps them feel better, and also helps the person they care about feel better.  One does not have to feel like a slacker and the other does not have to feel neglected.  It is a beautiful ‘win-win’.

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Imagine the peace of mind this service can bring to someone.

Ready to get started?  To become a Certified Senior Care Auditor you can only go to CertifiedCare.org for accredited PCA/SCA education and registry.  Yes, this is the only place providing authentic SCA certification.

To read more about Senior Care Auditing? Click on …

 

***   https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/insights/why-your-workplace-might-be-killing-you              http://www.cnn.com/2015/09/03/health/stress-work-secondhand-smoke/           https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1402378/  

 

Posted in Caregiving Career, Caregiving Education and Credentialing, Elder Abuse and Neglect, Elder Care, Elder Care Goods and Services, Home and Health Care Agency, Professional Eldercare, Senior Care Auditing, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Growing Need for Senior Care Auditing Providers

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Many Americans find themselves providing care for elderly loved ones. It seems never anticipated problems endlessly arise, such as maintaining quality of care and juggling long distance caregiving. On top of that, most people do not know how to thoroughly evaluate or efficiently manage care provided by caregivers or monitor the quality of care received by their loved ones. With the ever changing landscape that elder care has, how can families easily assess the level of care provided to their elderly loved ones while at the same time protect themselves from charges of abuse and neglect?

This service helps ensure the safety of seniors who are home alone or in their institutional environment. This service also ensures that seniors are receiving the proper quality of care they need, and that they are not being abused or neglected.

Senior Care Auditors help frail elders stay safe at home.

Senior Care Auditors help frail elders stay safe at home.

Communities across the country need Senior Care Auditors for the growing population who want to stay at home well into their 80s, 90s and 100s.  Many of the seniors will remain in their own homes to the end of their lives.  Most live alone and have family at a distance.  They and their families welcome the assistance and peace of mind a SCA can provide whether or not there is a caregiver available.  Busy, sandwiched families need help with loved ones nearby or at a distance.  Others need someone to look in on loved ones they might be estranged from or who live far away from them.

Senior Care Auditing is a new service expected to grow substantially over the next 30 years as the population of seniors sharply increases. U.S. Department of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration reports that “In 2050, the number of Americans aged 65 and older is projected to be 88.5 million, more than double its projected population of 40.2 million in 2010.”

Former family or professional caregivers make great Senior Care Auditors

Former family or professional caregivers make great Senior Care Auditors

Dr. Cathleen Carr, Executive Director of the education, certification and registry organization CertifiedCare says the answer is for the public to use Senior Care Auditors (SCAs). “Senior Care Auditing is an‘aging in place’ service”, she said.

What is a Senior Care Auditor? Senior Care Auditors provide scheduled visits with seniors in their private home or facility. They complete an audit of the residence and senior by evaluating the premises and person(s) condition (not health condition, but mood and appearance). While onsite, the Senior Care Auditor completes the checklist and transmits it to the client.

Agencies and service providers hire SCAs part time.  Most registered and certified SCAs work for themselves for agencies in their communities or for private clients.

Some Senior Care Auditors also provide personal care or other convenient services, if requested.  Adding the SCA service to an existing senior care service, like transportation, personal care, companionship, errands, etc., is the smartest way to go to quickly grow your clientele.  Seniors know other seniors and their families know other families in similar circumstances and word of mouth gets around fast.

CertifiedCare.org provides accredited certifications for Senior Care Auditors

CertifiedCare.org provides accredited certifications for Senior Care Auditors who are certified in five areas of elderly care and safety for all types of frail seniors.

It is important that SCAs have complete education about senior care and safety in the home environment.  How can you credibly evaluate the quality of service provided by a professional caregiver or thoroughly access a residence for safety when you do not know much about the subject? Our students get the comprehensive education they need to provide safe quality SCA and personal care services to any type of frail elderly person whether they live at home alone or are in an institutional environment, says Carr.

Dr. Carr explains, “Families at a distance will use this service to keep wise eyes on their loved one(s), and seniors without families use it for themselves. Most seniors seem to prefer one person providing assistance. They find it stressful to have to constantly get to know new people and have strangers in their homes. The typical home care aide is not educated about the aging process or modern in home person centered care. Their range of service provision is limited and turnover is high.”

SCAs can provide all types of companionship or other senior services

SCAs can provide all types of companionship or other senior services

After receiving complete accredited senior personal care education, registered certified Senior Care Auditors are much more capable and versatile than ordinary care aides.  These SCAs are specialized and certified in in elder personal care and safety, Alzheimer’s- Dementia and Special Needs care. This is why one registered certified Senior Care Auditor can provide multiple services and be paid accordingly.

See also Care.com article 40 fresh FAQS About Senior Care Auditing

“There are millions of seniors that reside at home alone, and almost 40% say they have a disability that requires some assistance ultimately making them injury prone or easily accessible to home care abuse. We need registered and certified Senior Care Auditors in every community across the country”, says Sydney Russell, Administrative Director of CertifiedCare.org.  CertifiedCare provides education, certification and registry for elite SCAs who work independently or for agencies.

Registered certified Senior Care Auditors are  able to provide personal care services, home care services and personal assistance services to their clients.

SCAs can provide other services to seniors if they wish.

SCAs can provide other services to seniors if they wish.

“Many seniors living at home are not sick and do not need a nurse, what they need is an extra pair of hands around the house and someone to check in on them to help them adjust their environment for safety and comfort, from time to time. Others want a caregiver evaluated by an independent third party while others need detection of and intervention from abuse, registered and certified Senior Care Auditors can do all of that”, Russell goes on to say.

To become a registered certified Senior Care Auditor visit CertifiedCare.org.

 

See more about CertifiedCare.org and Senior Care Auditing at Care.com

Would you consider becoming a Senior Care Auditor?

Find out about online caregiver certification programs here https://www.care.com/c/stories/7921/online-caregiver-certification/

Learn how to be a happier and more confident caregiver here https://www.care.com/c/stories/7889/how-to-be-a-respected-confident-and-happier/

This article about Senior Care Auditing is also published at CARE.COM https://www.care.com/c/stories/7953/news-about-senior-care-auditing/

Posted in Aging at home, Caregiving Career, Caregiving Education and Credentialing, Elder Abuse and Neglect, Elder Care Goods and Services, Professional Eldercare, Senior Care Auditing, Special Needs | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

40 Fresh FAQs about the Senior Care Auditing Career

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1) WHAT IS A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

A Senior Care Auditor is a person who provides senior care audits. This person has learned how to evaluate a seniors environment for safety issues, elder abuse and neglect fact finding, and many other criterion necessary for seniors healthy, comfortable life. Some Senior Care Auditors also are able to provide a wide range of personal care or domestic care and maintenance services. Senior Care Auditors make it possible for seniors to continue to live at home longer.  In many instances, Senior Care Auditors also help ease a individual or families burden related to time, work and costs of providing senior care.

2) WHAT DOES A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR DO?

          A certified Senior Care Auditor knows how to spot and stop elder abuse and neglect.  They know how to report abuse or neglect to authorities.  They compile electronic reports related to the seniors home condition, safety of environment, signs of elder abuse and self-neglect; help protect people from false charges of elder abuse and neglect, they can evaluate the quality and competency of personal care services provided by a family or hired caregiver.  Some Senior Care Auditors are also able to  provide other senior care services or domestic assistance services themselves.

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3) WHAT IS A SENIOR CARE AUDIT?  

The audit is a report compiled by the senior care auditor that covers:

  • The cleanliness of the environment of which the elder lives
  • Various odors in the environment of which the elder lives
  • An assessment of the caregiver regarding performance of duties, attitude and accessibility
  • An accounting of the operation of appliances (ex. HVAC, refrigerator, other technology)
  • Observations of sufficient supplies like food and toiletries
  • Observation and assessment of the senior related to mood, hygiene
  • Observation and assessment of signs of abuse and/or neglect
  • Safety threats and the environment
  • Related quality of care assessment for matters such as pet(s), lawn and garden, ice and snow removal, etc.

4) WHERE DO SENIOR CARE AUDITORS WORK?

              Any where there are senior citizens.

5) WHERE ARE SENIOR CARE AUDIT SERVICES NEEDED?

              Any where there are senior citizens.

6) I HAVE NOT HEARD OF THIS SERVICE OR CAREER BEFORE.  WHY IS THAT?

              This new service and career recently launched in early 2014.

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CertifiedCare.org educates caregivers and SCAs and offers the only accredited Senior Care Auditor certification program.

7) WHERE DO I GET CERTIFIED TO PROVIDE SENIOR CARE AUDITOR SERVICES?

Accredited comprehensive CSCA certification is only available form CertifiedCare.org.  The program covers  Long Distance Care, Personal Care, Alzheimer’s-Dementia, Special Needs, and Care Auditing and is available online from any computer or mobile device 24/7.  Click here to register for Senior Care auditor certification now.

8) WHAT KINDS OF SENIORS BENEFIT FROM A CARE AUDIT?

               All types of seniors can benefit from Senior Care Auditing:  Those who live in a private home.  Those who live in residential care or assisted living facility.  Adults or seniors living with Special Needs.  Adults living with early stage dementia or other chronic illness. Seniors who live in rural areas. Seniors who live alone.  Senior couples or roommates where one might be vulnerable to abuse.  Seniors who do not enjoy regular visits from loved ones.  Seniors who are not communicative.  Seniors who seem stressed by their caregiver.  Seniors who seem overwhelmed by grief or depression.  Seniors who want someone available to them when they want or need a little help or assurance.

Go to Care.com for more information about Senior Care Auditing

9) WHO NEEDS A SENIOR CARE AUDITORS SERVICES?

              Many different types of ordinary people need a senior care auditor to help them:  Individuals with demanding careers; sandwiched Moms or Dads; people who live far apart from their elderly loved one(s); people with many elders to look after; people who do not like caregiving; people who do not enjoy a pleasant relationship with their relative, but do want them looked after; people who do not want to be the provider of personal or domestic assistance; seniors who want a caregiver scrutinized by an independent 3rd party; seniors who want intervention to stop elder abuse.

             Professionals need senior care auditors to help them: Prosecuting attorneys who need witnesses for abuse/neglect cases; Defense Attorneys who need expert witnesses for abuse/neglect defense; government agencies who oversee aging populations; family members or friends who suspect abuse or neglect; Private investigators; people who can afford to delegate support to others; people who usually provide care but need respite or travel time away.

             Other third parties need senior care auditor services:  People who want a facility scrutinized for quality of care; Families who want an independent 3rd party to get ‘the truth’ about a loved one’s home and personal condition; Neighbors who care about frail neighbors who seem to be struggling with self or home care; Family members, friends or neighbors who are concerned about a pet or pets being neglected;  Home Health Agencies who need independent 3rd party feedback about caregiver service and professionalism; insurance companies; Home Care Providers who need independent 3rd party feedback about home care service and professionalism.

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10) WHO HIRES A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              Same as above:  Many different types of people.  Individuals with demanding careers; sandwiched Moms or Dads; people who live far apart from their elderly loved one(s); people with many elders to look after; people who do not like caregiving; people who do not enjoy a pleasant relationship with their relative, but do want them looked after; people who do not want to be the provider of personal or domestic assistance; seniors who want a caregiver scrutinized by an independent 3rd party; seniors who want intervention to stop elder abuse; Prosecuting attorneys who need witnesses for abuse/neglect cases; Defense Attorneys who need expert witnesses for abuse/neglect defense; government agencies who oversee aging populations; family members or friends who suspect abuse or neglect; Private investigators; people who can afford to delegate support to others; people who usually provide care but need respite or travel time away;  People who want a facility scrutinized for quality of care; Families who want an independent 3rd party to get ‘the truth’ about a loved one’s home and personal condition; Neighbors who care about frail neighbors who seem to be struggling with self or home care; Family members, friends or neighbors who are concerned about a pet or pets being neglected;  Home Health Agencies who need independent 3rd party feedback about caregiver service and professionalism; insurance companies; Home Care Providers who need independent 3rd party feedback about home care service and professionalism.

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CSCAs work with all types of ordinary and professional people.

11) HOW MUCH CAN I CHARGE FOR A SENIOR CARE AUDIT?

              Senior Care Auditors who are unaffiliated can charge what their market will allow.  Prices charged range from $30-$100 and, of course can be higher in affluent areas and lower in not so affluent areas.

12) HOW MUCH DO I GET PAID FOR A SENIOR CARE AUDIT?

              That depends upon who you work for, affiliate with, or what you choose to charge. A suggested flat fee starts around $30.

13) WHO PAYS FOR A SENIOR CARE AUDIT?

              Usually the individual who requested the report for a loved one.  Sometimes, seniors order and pay for their own senior care audit report(s).

14) WHO GETS THE SENIOR CARE AUDIT REPORT?

              The person who paid for it.  Of course, the senior can request a copy, if they did not pay for the report.

15) WHAT TYPE OF PERSONAL CARE SERVICES CAN I PROVIDE AS A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

          That decision is entirely up to you or the company you attach yourself to. None or whatever you are professionally able to.

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16) CAN A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR COME TO A FACILITY AND PERFORM AN AUDIT?

Yes, Senior Care Auditors know how to perform facility audits.  However, these audits are not to be confused with government or accounting audits.

17) WHO MAKES A GOOD SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              You must like seniors; be comfortable going into peoples’ homes and conducting inquiries and assessments of them and their environment; have a detail oriented mind; are curious and inquisitive; are resourceful; are organized; have the ability to communicate verbally and in writing clearly and appropriately; are professional; can manage technology.

Do you like working with seniors? Than you will like being a Senior Care Auditor.

Do you like working with seniors? Than you will like being a Senior Care Auditor.

18) WHAT KIND OF QUALIFICATIONS DO I NEED TO BECOME A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              Typically, at least 2 years of experience in long term care; a clean drug and criminal record, and senior care auditor certification; otherwise, whatever other companies might require.

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The accredited and comprehensive Senior Care Auditor program offered by CertifiedCare.org teaches you how to spot and stop abuse and neglect.

19) WHAT KIND OF EDUCATION DO I NEED TO BECOME A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

               It depends upon the type of career and you want to have and service versatility you want to provide.  Technically, you can just hang out a shingle, with no formal education required for this work. However, formal credentials are important to the public and other professional service providers you might wish to conduct business with.

       In order to have formal marketable credentials you must complete the only comprehensive senior care auditor certification program (which includes 4 Personal Care Aide specialty certifications along with the Senior Care Auditor certification) only offered by CertifiedCare.org. Their programs are accredited, online and available 24/7.

       Penrose hires SCAs and has minimal entry requirements, you do not even need a background in personal care.  Otherwise, shop around for whatever program suits your needs, but your service options will be limited if you do not have personal care, nursing, or other senior care service certifications or licenses that your clients will demand.

20) CAN I WORK FROM HOME AS A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              Yes.  This is an great career for those who wish to work from home. 

21) WHERE CAN I GET A JOB AS A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              Typically , Senior Care Auditors have their own business.  Do an internet search for senior care auditing companies who might be hiring employees.  Expect to only get part time hired work, though.

22) HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO BECOME A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              Typically just a matter of days.  It depends on how quickly you complete your education.  CertifiedCare reports that most of their students are finished within 2-3 weeks for all five modules of their program, some finish much more quickly.

23) WHERE DO I GET MY CERTIFICATION  TO BECOME A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              CertifiedCare.org provides the only comprehensive and accredited SCA education and certification and maintains a free public registry for credentials verification.  The advantage of this is you can work anywhere with quality credentials, not just for a particular employer who might issue a certificate for an orientation class.  

24) CAN I WORK PART TIME AS A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              Yes.

25) CAN I WORK AT A HOME HEALTH AGENCY AS A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              Yes.

26) I’M A PCA/HHA/CNA/LPN/RN/LSW/GCM.  CAN I BECOME A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              Yes.  If you like working with seniors you are an ideal candidate. You will make more money due to higher demand if you are able and willing to provide some level of personal and/or domestic care for your clients.

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27) I’M RETIRED/OVER 40/OVER 65.  CAN I BECOME A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              Yes, if you are healthy and can manage travel and the technical responsibilities of the job.  Your age is actually advantageous and a desirable quality for this type of senior care service.

28) I’M A FAMILY CAREGIVER.  CAN I BECOME A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              Yes.  Just be sure you like seniors in general.  Taking care of a stranger is not like taking care of a loved one.

29) CAN I WORK MY OTHER JOB AND PROVIDE SENIOR CARE AUDITING SERVICES?

              Yes.  If you other job permits, take advantage of the scheduling flexibility this service can provide to make extra money.

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30) CAN I ADD THIS SERVICE TO MY EXISTING SENIOR CARE BUSINESS?

              Yes. This is the most easiest and most efficient way to start a Senior Care auditing business.

31) DO I HAVE TO JOIN A NETWORK OR COMPANY IN ORDER TO HAVE A SENIOR CARE AUDITING BUSINESS?

              No.

32) HOW DO I GET CLIENTS AS A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

         Typically, a Senior Care Auditor needs to make every effort to grow their own business and get clients.  A good quality senior care auditor education program will teach you where, and how to do all that.  If you work for an agency you will probably have leads given to you,but you might still be expected to drum up some business on your own.

33) WHY WOULD SOMEONE NEED ONGOING SERVICE IF THE FIRST FEW AUDITS ARE OKAY?

          Because things change over time and often unexpectedly: caregivers rotate and have different standards and personalities, appliances break down, seniors get sick, and so on.

34) WHAT IS DIFFERENT ABOUT A CERTIFIEDCARE.org CERTIFIED  SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

            CertifiedCare.org education teaches you everything you need to know about providing elder care in any environment and senior care auditing, including how to have a successful career.  CertifiedCare.org senior care education is top notch and unmatched – these people take senior care seriously.

35) HOW MUCH MONEY WILL I EARN AS A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

              That depends.  If you work for yourself and only provide the senior care auditing service then you can charge between $40-100 for that service, depending upon the market you are in.  Otherwise, pay will depend upon your employer.  Senior Care Auditors who provide personal care or other domestic services will make more money, because they will be in greater demand.   The other variable is how much you work.  Senior Care Auditors willing to work holidays, weekends, evenings, will probably make more money.

36) I HAVE A CRIMINAL RECORD.  CAN I BECOME A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

             You can become a senior care auditor and own our own business.  You might be able to work with another senior care auditing company or agency depending upon their policy.  HOWEVER, If you have been convicted in any jurisdiction of any crime involving theft, fraud, or violence you will, of course, have a much more difficult time getting hired by any agency.

37) I HAVE BEEN IN REHAB.  CAN I BECOME A SENIOR CARE AUDITOR?

            You can become a senior care auditor and own our own business.  You might be able to work with another senior care auditing company or agency depending upon their policy.

38) WHERE DO I START TO BEGIN THIS CAREER?

             If you intend to hold yourself out as a certified Senior Care Auditor, get your accredited education & certification from CertifiedCare.org.  Otherwise, simply set up your senior care auditing service in compliance with your local and state business ordinances and laws or seek employment at an agency.

39)  WHERE IS THE SENIOR CARE AUDITOR SERVICE LEGAL?

This senior care service is legal in all United States and is not prohibited in any jurisdiction elsewhere.

40)  WHERE CAN I GET REGISTERED CREDENTIALS FOR SENIOR CARE AUDITING?

Accredited and registered certifications for Senior Care Auditing are available online at CertifiedCare.org.  Some employers offer a certificate for completing their orientation to their service, but those credentials are only useful for that employer and are not recognized elsewhere.

For more details or information about senior care auditing, or

how to become a senior care auditor  visit CertifiedCare.org 

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Posted in Caregiving, Certified Caregiver, Certified Caregiving, Elder Abuse and Neglect, Elder Care Goods and Services, Professional Eldercare, Senior Care Auditing, Special Needs, Sweet Relief CAP | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Affordable Online Caregiver Certification

Caregivers are busy people.  Busy with work, life, kids and/or other important relationships, and loving care.

Caregivers are also watching their wallets.  Professional caregivers do not make much money and informal family caregivers rarely make any from caregiving –  and might have to give up their job to provide care.

There is only so much time, energy and money.

The thing is, these days there are many who are concerned about elder abuse and neglect and the increasing awareness of how challenging caring for an  elderly person is or will become over time.  More states are passing laws, more agencies are requiring pre-employment certification. More clients and families are expecting a caregiver who provides primary care for an elder to get educated about their responsibilities and be certified to show they actually know what their are expected to do.

The days of providing just kindness and basic assistance are over.  Soon all caregivers need to be certified.  It’s just smart – and increasingly the law.

So what is a busy and broke caregiver to do?

Get your certification online.  It is convenient, much less expensive, study when you want/can and test online when you are ready.  Start when you want, finish when you can.  Be done with it and never miss a beat with the rest of your life ‘gotta dos’.

Online education programs are everywhere these days for every career  you can think of.  They are appreciated for their easy accessibility- no driving, parking and running around required.  They save lots of time, energy and money.  They are reliable, respected, and (thanks to technology) they are a good modern education option.

What you need to look for in online caregiver certification programs:

1) Comprehensiveness:  Chronic illnesses and Alzheimer’s or other dementia can develop down the road, even if not a problem now.  It is important to recognize the early signs.  Dying and death is part of long term care for seniors.  Do yourself a favor and be ready ahead of time for the inevitable.  It also important to know ahead of time if you are able and willing to handle the developments.

2) Free and immediate test retakes:  If the tests are real, you might need a retake (happens all the time).  No shame in that, but you should not have to pay again.

3) Online Credentials Verification Registry:  Prospective employers need to be able to easily confirm you have the credentials you say you have.

4) Mobile friendly accessibility so you really can study when and how you want to.

5)  Accreditation or some proof that the certification entity knows what they are doing.

Very few Personal Care Aide certification options are available, but check out CertifiedCare.org http://certifiedcare.org their programs check off all the boxes and then some and are legal everywhere) or PHI if you live in New York.  Also, check with your States’ certification requirements and follow those rules.

Posted in Advocacy, Caregiving, Caregiving Career, Caregiving Education and Credentialing, Caring for a Veteran, Certified Care.org, Certified Caregiver, Certified Caregiving, Dementia Caregiving, Elder Abuse and Neglect, Elder Care, Home and Health Care Agency, Professional Eldercare | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

What is Senior Care Auditing?

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Senior Care Auditing is a new service expected to grow substantially over the next 30 years as the population of seniors sharply increases. U.S. Department of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration reports that “In 2050, the number of Americans aged 65 and older is projected to be 88.5 million, more than double its projected population of 40.2 million in 2010.”
Senior Care Auditors (SCAs) provide scheduled visits to seniors in their private home or facility. They complete an audit of the residence and senior by evaluating the premises and person(s) condition (obvious health condition, mood and appearance).
Communities across the country need Senior Care Auditors for the growing population who want to stay at home well into their 80s, 90s and 100s. Caregivers who live at a distance can use Senior Care Auditors to check on loved ones from time to time.  
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If a senior has a caregiver, use a Senior Care Auditor to check up on the dynamics between them and to report on the quality of care being provided.  Your senior might not want to make waves or complain about an uncomfortable or careless relationship with a caregiver, so the SCA can do it for them.
Hospital re-admissions are one of the costliest expenses across the health care system, and senior care auditing can play a big role in reducing avoidable re-admissions. 
A recent pilot study approved by Harvard Medical School has found some initial success with this service that aims to reduce hospital re-admissions and neglect among home care patients. The study, which was conducted over 6 months in early 2016, found that caregivers who utilize a short checklist about their patients’ conditions were able to report a number of changes that could result in more costly care interventions or criminal charges if left untreated.
Caregivers reported that the checklist had a largely positive effect and felt “enthusiastic about the intervention,” according to the study. They even noted that the checklist did not add much time to the clock-out process overall, and enjoyed feeling they had a larger role in the overall care of the care recipient.
Senior Care Auditors typically are former informal caregivers and all types of nurses who like working with seniors but do not want to have to do the ‘heavy lifting’ often required in other types of nursing practice.  The service can include providing personal care services, but that is not the main job of a Senor Care Auditor and providing those kinds of services is optional.
 “The Senior Care Auditing service helps ensure the safety of seniors who are home alone or in an institutional environment. This service also ensures that seniors are receiving the proper quality of care they need, and that they are not being abused or neglected”, said Dr. Cathleen Carr, Executive Director of CertifiedCare which offers the only accredited Senior Care Auditing Certification program anywhere.
 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR  Cathleen V. Carr has an extensive background covering many specialties including healthcare, law, education and elder care. Her personal background and professional expertise has shaped a series of caregiver certification programs with the highest standards in the elder caregiving field.  Dr. Carr founded CertifiedCare.org  in 2008 and has worked with over 2,000 caregivers from all over the United States and abroad.
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Where the 2016 Presidential Candidates stand on caregiver policies

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Caregiving typically doesn’t get much lip service on the national political stage, but that appears to be changing in the current presidential race. While much of the candidates’ statements about caregiving during the campaign have focused on childcare, the challenges facing the millions of Americans who provide unpaid care for an elderly loved one have clearly helped propel the issue forward.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump on Caregiving

Both Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump during the campaign have laid out proposals to support elder caregivers, and the 2016 platforms for both parties have included sections on senior care.

The attention that both campaigns have given to the issue reflects the growing numbers of family caregivers whose finances and careers are affected by the unpaid care they provide to aging family members.

More than four in 10 families spend at least $5,000 on caregiving costs during the previous year and 72 percent said caregiving has negatively impacted their jobs.

Below are the two major presidential candidates’ plans to support family caregivers.

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Where the 2016 Presidential Candidates stand on family caregiver policies

Hillary Clinton on Caregiving

Tax Credit Proposal

Clinton is proposing a tax credit for family caregivers of elderly parents or grandparents worth up to $1,200 per year. The tax credit would help offset the first $6,000 of out-of-pocket caregiving expenses each year.

The plan is aimed at middle-class family caregivers with a combined household income of less than $120,000. Families with a higher income would not be eligible for the tax break, nor would those who are caring for a spouse.

Expanded Social Security Benefits

Family caregivers in the U.S. who leave the workforce due to caregiving may face lower social security retirement benefits, since those benefits are based on earnings during a worker’s 35 highest-paid years. Clinton wants to change this by expanding social security benefits for people who must leave their jobs to care for an aging loved one.

Under her proposal, family caregivers who take time off from the workforce to care for a loved one would still be able to earn credits toward Social Security retirement benefits.

“No one should face meager Social Security checks because they took on the vital role of caregiver for part of their career…Americans should receive credit toward their Social Security benefits when they are out of the paid workforce because they are acting as caregivers,” a Clinton campaign factsheet on the proposal reads.

Guaranteed Paid Family Medical Leave

Clinton is proposing guaranteed paid family and medical leave not only for men and women to care for a new child, but also for people caring for an ailing family member. Under her proposal, workers who take time off to care for a seriously ill relative would receive at least two thirds of their current pay during their leave.

Support for Long-term Care Costs

Included in the 2016 Democratic Party Platform is a section called “Ensuring Long-Term Care, Services, and Supports” that pledges the party’s support for more long-term care resources for older adults, if few concrete details. The platform states that there is a “long-term care crisis that prevents too many seniors and people with disabilities from being able to live with dignity at home or in their communities.”

“Democrats will take steps to strengthen and expand the home care workforce, give seniors and people with disabilities access to quality, affordable long-term care, services and supports, and ensure that all of these resources are readily available at home or in the community,” the platform reads.

Expanding Opportunities for Paid Caregivers

In addition to her proposal to help family caregivers, Clinton has also proposed a federal Care Workers Initiative. According to the Clinton campaign, the aim of the initiative is “developing strategies to improve opportunities for care workers to earn the skills they need; creating paths to professionalize the workforce through career ladders and apprenticeships…providing care workers an opportunity to come together and make their voices heard in support of a stronger system; and by developing and enhancing matching services to connect care workers to the families who need them.”

Additional Support for Caregivers

The former Secretary of State has also said she wants to significantly increase federal funding for the Lifespan Respite Care Program, which provides money to states for community-based respite care services for family caregivers of both children and adults.

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Check the CertifiedCare.org registry prior to employment.

Donald Trump on caregiving

Tax Deduction Proposal

Like his Democratic rival, Trump is proposing a tax deduction to help people offset out-of-pocket costs for elder care. Under this proposal, working family caregivers could deduct up to $5,000 each year from their taxes for senior care costs that are necessary in order to continue work outside of the home, according to a report on the Trump campaign website.

Dependent Care Savings Accounts for Long-term Care Costs

Trump’s proposal would allow people to open tax-protected dependent care savings accounts to help put away money for either child care or senior care for aging family members. Total contributions to these accounts would be capped at $2,000 per year, but would roll over from year to year, according to the campaign.

Under this plan, the money in dependent care savings accounts could be used toward in-home care, long-term care services or adult day care, a campaign report states.

Trump is also proposing that the federal government match up to $500 per year contributed to these accounts by low-income families.

“The ability to set aside funds for elder care is critically important because taking time off from working to care for elderly family members reduces a woman’s financial readiness for retirement, and can increase a woman’s risk of living in poverty in old age,” the campaign statement reads.

Additional Support for Caregivers

While it doesn’t appear that Trump has commented during the campaign on respite care programs for caregivers, the 2016 Republican Party platform does include some statements about home care for seniors. But, similar to the Democratic platform’s section on long-term care, no specific policy proposals are discussed.

“Our aging population must have access to safe and affordable care,” the platform reads. “Because most seniors desire to age at home, we will make home care a priority in public policy and will implement programs to protect against elder abuse.”

Though there are key differences between the two candidates’ proposals, the attention given to caregiving this election season is striking, and underscores the importance of planning for the care of the country’s growing aging population.

Whether or not you’re currently providing care for an aging loved one, chances are it’s only a matter of time before your family will face tough questions about senior care. Getting the conversation started about topics like long-term care preferences and end-of-life wishes is an important step in ensuring your loved ones get the care that’s right for them.

By Laura Dixon, Caring.com editor

 

Posted in Advocacy, Caregiving, Elder Care, Elder Law and Finances, Government, News, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

12 Documents Everyone Should have Handy

Questions for Dr. CC

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Dear Dr. CC,

I hoped you would write about what papers people need to have ready if they die or can’t handle their own affairs. I will be the one providing care for my parents who are in their 80’s and in pretty good shape but I see the signs that they are slipping. I am afraid to wait until times get hard for them to get this done. I know about a will but what else is important? I subscribe to your blog, Elder Care Advice, and have not seen this yet addressed.  Thank you.

 Elizabeth W.,   Elkhart, Illinois, USA

 

Dear Elizabeth:

First, congratulations are due you, Elizabeth, for getting in front of your upcoming duties before they become more difficult to control. Not everyone is clever or fortunate enough to get affairs in order prior to need due to incapacity or death.

The original Will is vitally important, as it not only identifies the heirs but also names the Executor/Executrix. Depending on what assets are owned at the time of death, you may need to probate the Will to be recognized by others (like banks) as the Executor.

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In addition to a Will, there are 11 other documents you should have handy no matter where you live in the United States.

Durable Power of Attorney

A durable power of attorney is a legal document that authorizes someone to act for you. A power of attorney can be broad or limited. The person holding the DPoA acts as an agent who do such things as sign checks and tax returns, enter into contracts, buy or sell real estate, deposit or withdraw funds, run a business, or anything else you do for yourself. Since the power-of-attorney document is tailored for its specific purpose, your agent cannot act outside the scope designated in the document. A regular power of attorney ends when its purpose is fulfilled or at your incapacity or death. A durable power of attorney ends at your death.

 

Health Care Power of Attorney

A Health Care Power of Attorney (HCPOA) names someone who stands in your shoes and tells the doctors what to do or what not do for you. Health care decisions include the power to consent, refuse consent or withdraw consent to any type of medical care, treatment, service or procedure. A HCPOA is also called a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care, Health Care Proxy, or Medical Power of Attorney.

Living Will 

A living will is a legal document that specifies the type of medical care that an individual does or does not want in the event that he is unable to communicate his wishes.

Doctors and hospitals consult living wills to determine whether or not the patient wants life-sustaining treatment, such as assisted breathing or tube feeding. In the absence of a living will, decisions about medical care become the responsibility of the spouse, family members or other third parties.

Pre-arranged or pre-paid funeral contracts
Ask for any pre-arranged or pre-paid funeral contracts. There may also be a legal document called Appointment of Agent for Disposition of Remains, in which he gives binding funeral instructions and names a specific person to be in charge of the arrangements. Perhaps he desired cremation; if so, ask about membership in groups like The Neptune Society or The Memorial Society.

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Retirement Account Numbers and Papers

Get the Social Security cards, or at least the numbers, for each of your parents.  Also, contact the Office of Personnel Management if either is retired from Civil Service and contact DFAS (Defense Finance and Accounting Service) if either is receiving a military retirement. You might need the military DD214 discharge papers, too.

Life insurance policies

Locate any life insurance policies and any annuity policies they owned.

Titles to any real estate and/or vehicles
If they own real estate, the deed will indicate if it was owned jointly with anyone else. The deed may also show whether there are any rights of survivorship associated with the property. It is also possible that he established a Living Trust. If so, find the Trust and find any deed under which they transferred title to the trust.

Established trusts

Look for Trusts and determine if either of your parents is the Trustee, and to see who is appointed as successor Trustee, then contact those people to provide them with copies. Trusts can take many forms these days such as a Charitable Trust, a Gun Trust or a Pet Trust.

Statements to bank and brokerage accounts

Regarding finances, make a list of bank and brokerage accounts. Find the last 12 months of statements if you can. Search for tax returns from the last several years.

List of Internet Passwords

Compile or locate a list of passwords they use for online banking or online brokerages, and to be able to access their email accounts.

List of Important Contacts

Important contacts include (but are not limited to) Physicians, Lawyer, Accountant, Stock Broker, close friends, religious leader, fraternal or professional membership organization contacts, friendly neighbors, social worker, Home Care or Home Health Care Agency, Insurance Agent, etc.

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What to do Next

Get these 12 documents together, make copies, and give the originals/copies to the people that will need them. Whoever has been designated the DPoA needs an original of that document. Another trusted relative or an Attorney are the obvious first choices for securing copies or originals where they can be easily accessed when the time comes.  Keep a set for yourself, too.

Since you know in advance that you will be providing care for your frail parents now is also the best time to get yourself ready for the enormous task of elder care by getting your caregiver education and certification.   Doing so now will be one less thing you need to do later, gain you much more respect from others you will have to deal with, and get you better prepared for what is to come. Go to CertifiedCare.org for comprehensive convenient programs.

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Caregiver education and certifications for better caregivers around the world.

Posted in Advocacy, Aging, Aging at home, Caregiving, Elder Law and Finances, Questions 4 Dr. CC, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment