What is Caregiving ? 10 Pearls of Caregiving Advice


What is Caregiving ?

Post compliments of sraction.org

Caregivers are individuals who provide care to chronically ill or disabled family members or friends.  It requires information, understanding, encouragement, patience and energy. Caregivers become part advocate, nurse, organizer and financial analyst in addition to maintaining their other responsibilities. The most effective caregivers serve as advocates for their patient, understand the persons’ needs to socialize and have personal choice, and become familiar with insurance and financial matters connected with caregiving.

(Click on images below for more information)

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Caregivers typically help someone with activities of daily living while the person goes through a challenging health diagnosis, treatment, and recovery.  Caring for someone with a life-threatening disease can be emotionally and physically draining. Caregiver burn-out can occur even when caring for a dearest loved one.

 

For these reasons, caregivers are encouraged to:

1)  Take control of your life.  Remember to continue to live your life and not allow it to completely revolve around your loved one’s illness.

2)  Get educated about caregiving. The more you know about your loved one’s condition, the more empowered you will feel. CertifiedCare.org offers 4 caregiving programs that are available on line 24/7, is accredited, and the prices are reasonable.

Caring for an elder is not like caring for a child. Learn how to be a great elder caregiver at http://CertifiedCare.org

3) Remember to take care of and be kind to yourself.  The job you are performing is difficult and can be taxing.  It is important for you to have personal quality time, to do what you like, for you.

4) Be aware of how you are feeling emotionally.  Depression is common for individuals in your position.  Seek professional help immediately if you are experiencing signs of depression.

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5) Accept assistance from others when offered and make specific suggestions as to what they can do.

CertifiedCare requirements exceed most state minimum requirements for Personal Care Aide education. http://certifiedcare.org

6) Encourage your loved one’s independence.  Caring for somebody does not necessarily entail doing everything for them.  New technologies and ideas provide options that help promote and support a healthy level of independence.

7) Listen to your heart.  Your gut instincts most often lead you in the right direction.

8) Allow yourself to grieve.  Then allow yourself to move forward and dream of new possibilities and experiences.

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9) Seek support from other caregivers and obtain strength and comfort in the understanding of others in similar situations.  You are not alone.

10) Learn and use stress-reduction techniques.

Complete PCA Certification Program = Elder+ Alzhimer’s- Dementia & SpecialNeeds caregiving.

Post compliments of sraction.org

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About Elder Care Advice blog

Get professional elder care giving advice, advocacy, education and tips for those who care for and about the frail elderly at the ElderCareAdvice blog. We are generously sponsored by CertifiedCare.org. Most posts are written by Cathleen V. Carr, unless attributed otherwise. We welcome relevant submissions. Submit your article and by-line for publishing consideration (no promises!) to Havi at zvardit@yahoo.com, our own editor who will ensure submissions are given the best possible treatment and polish before publication, ensuring a professional level of publication. There is a nominal service fee involved ($45). Allow up to 30 days for publishing.
This entry was posted in Caregiving, Caring for a Veteran, Elder Care, Holistic Eldercare, Special Needs and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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